Donald Trump’s Healthcare Plan Would Make 18 Million People Uninsured, but also Lower Premiums Significantly

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Donald Trump’s healthcare plan would make 18 million people uninsured, but also lower premiums significantly for policies purchased directly by consumers, according to an independent study released Thursday.

The new policies would be more miserly in their coverage than what’s sold now, according to the Associated Press, which reported on study. Trump’s plan would have little effect on people covered by employers and those on Medicare.

But millions of low-income adults covered by the Medicaid expansion under President Barack Obama’s healthcare law would lose newly gained benefits. Separately, taxpayers might save money because the government no longer would have to subsidize insurance for millions of citizens.

The analysis by the nonpartisan Center for Health and Economy attempts to put some numbers to the healthcare concepts outlined on the GOP presidential candidate’s website. The center is a research group that includes both liberal and conservative experts.

The study found “substantial uncertainty” about one of Trump’s main ideas: allowing insurers to sell policies across state lines to promote competition. In 10 years’ time, it could lead to as many as 7 million people getting individual policies, or as few as 1 million, the study found.

Some of that uncertainty stems from the fact that health insurance remains a local and regional business.

Steve’s Quick Take: Surprise! Donald Trump’s substitute plan would have little effect on people covered by employers and those on Medicare. But millions of low-income adults covered by Obamacare would lose newly gained benefits.

According to the nonpartisan Center for Health and Economy, in 10 years time, Trump’s confused, messy program would either cover 7 million low-income citizens or just 1 million. If the latter number proves true, it’s back to square one. And I mean back to the pre-Obamacare situation of millions without any coverage.